GUI uses Exif and music tags to support batch renaming of files on Linux: Inviska renaming

EDIT: I have removed the link to the Inviska renamed website as it seems to have been taken over by others. I haven’t found the right source to download Inviska Rename on Linux. Until then, this article will not contain Inviska renamed links. I will edit Inviska Rename as soon as it is hosted on the appropriate website. InviskaRename is a free open source GUI batch file renaming utility for Linux, Mac, and Windows.
In addition to commonly used renaming functions (such as replacing some text with other text, inserting or deleting text, renaming file extensions, etc.), this tool can also rename folders, rename music based on tags, and rename using its Exif information photo. It can even use file attributes such as creation or modification dates for bulk renaming.
To prevent accidental file renaming, Inviska Rename displays a preview of the new file name before batch renaming files. As an extra step to prevent accidental file renaming, applications can also undo file renaming.

List of batch file and folder rename operations that can be performed via Inviska rename:

  • Rename using music tags (eg mp3 ID3v2 tags, FLAC tags, etc.)
  • Batch rename photos from digital photos using Exif metadata tags
  • Insert, delete, and replace text in file names or extensions
  • Rename multiple files using file creation or modification date / time
  • Rename files in batches with auto-numbering for easy sorting (you can place numbers before the file name, after the file name, or at a given position, allowing you to set a starting number and incrementing number)
  • Rename files by changing the file name to lowercase, uppercase, title case, or sentence case
  • Regular expression renaming
  • Filter to be renamed to only files, only folders, both files and folders, only files of selected items, or filter files by extension

In addition to this advanced batch file and folder renaming operation, Inviska renaming has the following features:

  • Full Unicode support allows batch renaming of files and folders in any language
  • Save common rename operations for future use
  • Option to restore original file name
  • Easily see the file name you want to change by highlighting the modified file name in the preview pane
  • Rename directly from Inviska to view Exif information for music tags and files
  • Free open source software for Linux, macOS and Windows (using Qt5)

Related: How to Enable Metadata-Based Batch Rename in GNOME Files on Ubuntu 18.04 or 18.10 (Nautilus)
It’s worth noting that by default, only some useful Exif tags are available for replacement. To use all available Exif tags, open the app preferences and enable “Load all Exif tags (not recommended unless needed)” in the Tags tab. The reason why this option is not recommended to be enabled by default is to prevent increasing the time it takes to load Exif information.
In addition, by default, the Regex rename feature is not exposed in the “Inviska Rename” user interface. To enable it, go to Preferences > RegEx And enable Show RegEx Name (Or rename the file extension) option.
What the application is missing is recursively renaming files in all subdirectories. Now you need to enter each directory containing the files you need to rename in order to be able to rename the files.
Inviska’s renaming feature is very similar to Metamorphose, a popular Linux and Windows batch file and folder renamer that appears to be deprecated. So if you are looking for a Metamorphose alternative to Linux (not only that), I suggest you try using Inviska rename.

Download Inviska Rename

EDIT: I have removed the link to the Inviska renamed website as it seems to have been taken over by others. I haven’t found the right source to download Inviska Rename on Linux. Until then, this article will not contain Inviska renamed links. After hosting the Inviska rename on the appropriate website, I will immediately edit the article.
On Linux, Inviska rename is available as an AppImage binary. To use it, download the AppImage file and double-click it to run the application. If your Linux distribution does not prompt you to make the file executable, right-click the file, select Properties and enable program execution or similar.
Please note that in my case, clicking the AppImage download link caused the binary to be loaded into the web browser. To download the AppImage file, right-click and select “Save Link As” or something similar.
If you want to build your own application, the Inviska renamed source code is also available for download on the download page (it is a bundle of all Inviska software).

Source

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